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Acrylic   44 Items  

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Ashen Knight - Canvas   (350806)
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Description:

An illustration of an ashen knight armed with a longbow standing at an exit of cave. In front of him stands a vacant castle carved out of serrated mountains. 

 

By Ricardo Nóbrega

website: stock.adobe.com

Form ID: 350806
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“Cosmic Cliffs” in the Carina Nebula (Acrylic)   (350828)
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Description:

Called the "Cosmic Cliffs," the region is actually the edge of a gigantic, gaseous cavity within NGC 3324, roughly 7,600 light-years away. What looks much like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope.

Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

Website: Webbtelescope.org

Form ID: 350828
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Blue Luminescent Abstract (Acrylic)   (350834)
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Description: A blue luminescent pattern featuring a striking balance between blurred electric blues and CRT scanlines.
By Vidsplay on NegativeSpace
Website: negativespace.co
Form ID: 350834
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Cassiopeia A: MIRI Compass Image (Acrylic)   (350837)
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Description:

This image of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, captured by Webb’s Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), shows compass arrows, scale bar, and color key for reference. The north and east compass arrows show the orientation of the image on the sky. Note that the relationship between north and east on the sky (as seen from below) is flipped relative to direction arrows on a map of the ground (as seen from above). The scale bar is labeled in light-years, which is the distance that light travels in one Earth-year. (It takes 0.25 years for light to travel a distance equal to the length of the scale bar.) One light-year is equal to about 5.88 trillion miles or 9.46 trillion kilometers. The field of view shown in this image is approximately 10 light-years across. This image shows invisible mid-infrared wavelengths of light that have been translated into visible-light colors. The color key shows which MIRI filters were used when collecting the light. The color of each filter name is the visible light color used to represent the infrared light that passes through that filter.

Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, Danny Milisavljevic (Purdue University), Tea Temim (Princeton University), Ilse De Looze (UGent)

Image Processing: Joseph DePasquale (STScI)

Website: Webbtelescope.org

Form ID: 350837
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Chamaeleon I Molecular Cloud: NIRCam Image (Acrylic)   (350840)
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Description:

This image by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) features the central region of the Chamaeleon I dark molecular cloud, which resides 630 light years away. The cold, wispy cloud material (blue, center) is illuminated in the infrared by the glow of the young, outflowing protostar Ced 110 IRS 4 (orange, upper left). The light from numerous background stars, seen as orange dots behind the cloud, can be used to detect ices in the cloud, which absorb the starlight passing through them. An international team of astronomers has reported the discovery of diverse ices in the darkest regions of a cold molecular cloud measured to date by studying this region. This result allows astronomers to examine the simple icy molecules that will be incorporated into future exoplanets, while opening a new window on the origin of more complex molecules that are the first step in the creation of the building blocks of life.

Credits: Image: NASA, ESA, CSA

Science: Fengwu Sun (Steward Observatory), Zak Smith (The Open University), IceAge ERS Team Image Processing: M. Zamani (ESA/Webb)

Website: Webbtelescope.org

Form ID: 350840
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Energy (Acrylic)   (350843)
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Description: A chaotic composition displaying wispy streams of smoke and exhibiting a combination of deep purples and lavender tints.

By Pellinni
Website: morguefile.com
Form ID: 350843
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Final Stand of the Gorilla King (Acrylic)   (350846)
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Description: A model displaying the final stand of the King Gorilla battling against a fleet of airplanes up top the Empire State Building.

By ranbud
Website: morguefile.com
Form ID: 350846
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Galactic Center: Chandra, Hubble, Spitzer (Acrylic)   (350849)
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Description:

An enormous swirling vortex of hot gas glows with infrared light, marking the approximate location of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy. This multiwavelength composite image includes near-infrared light captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, and was the sharpest infrared image ever made of the galactic center region when it was released in 2009. Dynamic flickering flares in the region immediately surrounding the black hole, named Sagittarius A*, have complicated the efforts of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration to create a closer, more detailed image. While the black hole itself does not emit light and so cannot be detected by a telescope, the EHT team is working to capture it by getting a clear image of the hot glowing gas and dust directly surrounding it. NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled to launch in December 2021, will combine Hubble’s resolution with even more infrared light detection. In its first year of science operations, Webb will join with EHT in observing Sagittarius A*, lending its infrared data for comparison to EHT’s radio data, making it easier to determine when bright flares are present, producing a sharper overall image of the region. In the composite image shown here, colors represent different wavelengths of light. Hubble’s near-infrared observations are shown in yellow, revealing hundreds of thousands of stars, stellar nurseries, and heated gas. The deeper infrared observations of NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope are shown in red, revealing even more stars and gas clouds. Light detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory is shown in blue and violet, indicating where gas is heated to millions of degrees by stellar explosions and by outflows from the supermassive black hole.

Credits: NASA, ESA, SSC, CXC, STScI

Website: Webbtelescope.org

Form ID: 350849
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Galactic Center in Near-infrared: Hubble (Acrylic)   (350853)
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Description:

Heated gas swirls around the region of the Milky Way galaxy’s supermassive black hole, illuminated in near-infrared light captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Released in 2009 to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy, this was the sharpest infrared image ever made of the galactic center region. NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled to launch in December 2021, will continue this research, pairing Hubble-strength resolution with even more infrared-detecting capability. Of particular interest for astronomers will be Webb’s observations of flares in the area, which have not been observed around any other supermassive black hole and the cause of which is unknown. The flares have complicated the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration’s quest to capture an image of the area immediately surrounding the black hole, and Webb’s infrared data is expected to help greatly in producing a clean image.

Credits: NASA, ESA, STScI, Q.D. Wang (UMass)

Website: Webbtelescope.org

Form ID: 350853
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Night Starry Sky (Acrylic)   (350857)
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Description:

Photograph of a galaxy millions of lightyears away featuring subtle hints of purple and magenta.
By Stephen Rahn
website: negativespace.co 

Form ID: 350857
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Jupiter's Polar Cyclone Storms (Juno)(Acrylic)   (350861)
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Description:

NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured infrared images that astronomers combined to create this picture of Jupiter’s north pole, showing a central cyclone and the eight cyclones that encircle it. Data indicate that the storms are enduring features at the pole, with each circumpolar cyclone almost as wide as the distance between Naples, Italy and New York City in the United States. Wind speeds in the storms can reach 220 miles per hour (350 kilometers per hour). The colors in this composite represent radiant heat; the yellow (thinner) clouds are about 9 degrees Fahrenheit (–13° Celsius) and the dark red (thickest) are around –181 degrees Fahrenheit (-83° Celsius).

By NASA, Caltech, SwRI, ASI, INAF, JIRAM Website: https://webbtelescope.org

Form ID: 350861
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Liftoff (Acrylic)   (350864)
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Description:

An eye-capturing photo of a rocket liftoff displaying heaps of smoke as the rocket charges into space.
By in Space Website: negativespace.co

Form ID: 350864
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Lynx Arc Star-Formation Region (Illustration) (Acrylic)   (350867)
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Description: The Lynx arc is a vast star birth region 12 billion light-years from Earth that contains 1 million ultra-hot stars. This artist's impression depicts torrent of ultraviolet radiation illuminating cold hydrogen gas. Astronomers regard this super star-birth region as an example of the early days of the universe where furious firestorms of star birth blazed across the skies.

Website: ESA, NASA, Robert A.E. Fosbury (ST-ECF)
Form ID: 350867
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Massive Star-Forming Region in 30 Doradus (Hubble)(Acrylic)   (350869)
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Description:

The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the massive young stellar grouping R136. The cluster of stars resides in the 30 Doradus nebula, a turbulent star birth region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen.

This nearby stellar nursery provides insights into the star lifecycle and how star clusters may have formed in the early universe.

Website: webbtelescope.org NASA, ESA, Elena Sabbi (ESA, STScI)

Form ID: 350869
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Multiwavelength View of Centaurus A (Hubble, Spitzer, Chandra, VLA)(Acrylic)   (350872)
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Description:

Centaurus A sports a warped central disk of gas and dust, which is evidence of a past collision and merger with another galaxy. It also has an active galactic nucleus that periodically emits jets. It is the fifth brightest galaxy in the sky and only about 13 million light-years away from Earth, making it an ideal target to study an active galactic nucleus – a supermassive black hole emitting jets and winds – with NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. This image was made using data from the Hubble, Spitzer, and Chandra space telescopes and the Very Large Array.

Website: webbtelescope.org NASA, CXC, SAO, Astrophotography by Rolf Olsen, NASA-JPL, Caltech, NRAO, AUI, NSF, UOH, M. J. Hardcastle

Form ID: 350872
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Orion Bar (Hubble) (Acrylic)   (350875)
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Description:

The Orion Bar is a diagonal, ridge-like feature of gas and dust in the lower left quadrant of this HUBBLE image of the Orion Nebula. Sculpted by the intense radiation from nearby hot, young stars, the Orion Bar at first glance appears to be shaped like a bar. It is probably prototypical of a photodissociation region, or PDR.

Website: webbtelescope.org NASA, ESA, Massimo Robberto (STScI, ESA), Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team Zolt G. Levay (STScI), Joseph DePasquale (STScI)

Form ID: 350875
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Pillars of Creation (NIRCam and MIRI Composite Image)(Acrylic)   (350887)
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Description:

By combining images of the iconic Pillars of Creation from two cameras aboard NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, the universe has been framed in its infrared glory. Webb’s near-infrared image was fused with its mid-infrared image, setting this star-forming region ablaze with new details.

Myriad stars are spread throughout the scene. The stars primarily show up in near-infrared light, marking a contribution of Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam). Near-infrared light also reveals thousands of newly formed stars – look for bright orange spheres that lie just outside the dusty pillars.

In mid-infrared light, the dust is on full display. The contributions from Webb’s Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) are most apparent in the layers of diffuse, orange dust that drape the top of the image, relaxing into a V. The densest regions of dust are cast in deep indigo hues, obscuring our view of the activities inside the dense pillars.

Dust also makes up the spire-like pillars that extend from the bottom left to the top right. This is one of the reasons why the region is overflowing with stars – dust is a major ingredient of star formation. When knots of gas and dust with sufficient mass form in the pillars, they begin to collapse under their own gravitational attraction, slowly heat up, and eventually form new stars. Newly formed stars are especially apparent at the edges of the top two pillars – they are practically bursting onto the scene.

At the top edge of the second pillar, undulating detail in red hints at even more embedded stars. These are even younger, and are quite active as they form. The lava-like regions capture their periodic ejections. As stars form, they periodically send out supersonic jets that can interact within clouds of material, like these thick pillars of gas and dust. These young stars are estimated to be only a few hundred thousand years old, and will continue to form for millions of years.

Almost everything you see in this scene is local. The distant universe is largely blocked from our view both by the interstellar medium, which is made up of sparse gas and dust located between the stars, and a thick dust lane in our Milky Way galaxy. As a result, the stars take center stage in Webb’s view of the Pillars of Creation.

The Pillars of Creation is a small region within the vast Eagle Nebula, which lies 6,500 light-years away.

Revisit Webb’s near-infrared image and its mid-infrared image. The Pillars of Creation was made famous by the Hubble Space Telescope’s 1995 image.

NIRCam was built by a team at the University of Arizona and Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center.

MIRI was contributed by ESA and NASA, with the instrument designed and built by a consortium of nationally funded European Institutes (The MIRI European Consortium) in partnership with JPL and the University of Arizona.

 

Website: webbtelescope.org NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI)

Form ID: 350887
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Quasar in the Early Universe (Illustration)(Acrylic)   (350902)
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Description:

Researchers will use all four instruments aboard the James Webb Space Telescope to study the three most distant quasars yet discovered. They will obtain new measurements of the masses of their central supermassive black holes, detail the stars and composition of their host galaxies, and observe nearby galaxies to learn more about their “neighborhoods” in the early universe. 

The three targets of this research program at a glance: J0313-1806 dates back to 670 million years after the big bang and is 1.6 billion times more massive than our Sun. J1007+2115, or Pōniuāʻena, was detected approximately 700 million years after the big bang and is 1.5 billion times more massive than our Sun. The third target, J1342+0928, dates back to 690 million years after the big bang and is 800 million times the mass of our Sun.

Website: webbtelescope.org NASA, ESA, CSA, Joseph Olmsted (STScI)

Form ID: 350902
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Raygun (Acrylic)   (350905)
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Description:

Vintage photograph of an alien ray gun circa 1945. Where did it come from? Why type of organisms brain floating inside the glass cartridge? Is it a human brain?

By wintersixfour
website: morguefile.com 

Form ID: 350905
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Rhino Graffiti (Acrylic)   (350908)
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Description:

Illustration of a Rhinoceros constructed out rags with hints of spray-paint.

By Isorepublic
website: negativespace.co 

Form ID: 350908
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Tarantula Nebula (NIRCam Image)(Acrylic)   (350911)
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Description:

In this mosaic image stretching 340 light-years across, Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) displays the Tarantula Nebula star-forming region in a new light, including tens of thousands of never-before-seen young stars that were previously shrouded in cosmic dust. The most active region appears to sparkle with massive young stars, appearing pale blue. Scattered among them are still-embedded stars, appearing red, yet to emerge from the dusty cocoon of the nebula. NIRCam is able to detect these dust-enshrouded stars thanks to its unprecedented resolution at near-infrared wavelengths. 

To the upper left of the cluster of young stars, and the top of the nebula’s cavity, an older star prominently displays NIRCam’s distinctive eight diffraction spikes, an artifact of the telescope’s structure. Following the top central spike of this star upward, it almost points to a distinctive bubble in the cloud. Young stars still surrounded by dusty material are blowing this bubble, beginning to carve out their own cavity. Astronomers used two of Webb’s spectrographs to take a closer look at this region and determine the chemical makeup of the star and its surrounding gas. This spectral information will tell astronomers about the age of the nebula and how many generations of star birth it has seen. 

Farther from the core region of hot young stars, cooler gas takes on a rust color, telling astronomers that the nebula is rich with complex hydrocarbons. This dense gas is the material that will form future stars. As winds from the massive stars sweep away gas and dust, some of it will pile up and, with gravity’s help, form new stars. 

NIRCam was built by a team at the University of Arizona and Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center.

Website: webbtelescope.org By: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Webb ERO Production Team

Form ID: 350911
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Vibrant Circuit Board (Acrylic)   (350914)
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Description:

A vibrant circuit board containing extreme detail of a sunset-orange circuit board.

By Lenharth Systems
Website: negativespace.co

Form ID: 350914
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Ethereal Mountains (Acrylic)   (350918)
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Description:

Landscape of a twisted and cold planet featuring jagged mountain ranges blanketed by ice and clouds.

 

Form ID: 350918
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Nano Soldier (Acrylic)   (350921)
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Description:

Illustration of a soldier armored with nanotech laying down heavy fire as they unsheathe their greatsword.

 

Form ID: 350921
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Legend (Acrylic)   (350925)
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Description:

A majestic castle perched atop a large rock formation, with lush green grass and trees surrounding it. In the foreground, there is a sword embedded in a rock, its blade glinting in the sunlight. The stunning landscape provides an awe-inspiring view.

Form ID: 350925
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Synthwave Cat (Acrylic)   (350930)
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Description:

A cat wearing retro sunglasses with the sun behind them.

Form ID: 350930
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Interdimensional (Acrylic)   (350933)
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Description:

An explorer reaches up towards a bright ring of light. They are surrounded by levitating rocks. The explorers cape waves in the wind as they stand in the shallow pool of dark liquid. They are eager to see where the portal will transport them.

Form ID: 350933
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Reclamation (Acrylic)   (350936)
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Description:

Clear skies and thick brush is not the first thing you think of when you hear the words abandoned city square. This serene landscape is void of any human life yet full of plant life.

Form ID: 350936
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